Australia and New Zealand Surgical and Respiratory Masks Market’s Top 5 Driving Forces

The Australia and New Zealand surgical and respiratory masks market is projected to expand at a 3.3% CAGR during the forecast period from 2015 to 2021, according to Persistence Market Research (PMR). By 2015, the market was expected to be worth US$137.8 mn and by 2021, the market is projected to be worth US$167.7 mn.

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Several factors will drive the Australia and New Zealand surgical and respiratory masks market:

  1. Rising Number of Surgical Procedures: One of the key drivers of the Australia and New Zealand surgical and respiratory masks market is the rise in the number of surgical procedures. Furthermore, in Australia, this rise has been particularly noticeable in cosmetic surgical procedures. According to the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIWH), the number of hospitalizations for weight loss surgical procedures has increased dramatically in the past decade, rising from about 500 in 1998 to 17,000 in 2007-08. This rise is projected to continue during the forecast period as well.

  2. Growing Hygiene Concerns: The growing concerns regarding health and hygiene are also expected to drive the Australia and New Zealand surgical and respiratory masks market greatly. This trend is significantly influenced by the increasing prevalence of healthcare associated infections (HAIs). According to the Health Quality & Safety Commission New Zealand, around 10% of patients admitted to modern hospitals tend to acquire one or more HAI.

  3. Innovation: The trend of product innovation will have a positive impact on the Australia and New Zealand surgical and respiratory masks market. This can help the market gain new demand channels. Players in the Australia and New Zealand surgical and respiratory masks market are focused on making surgical and respiratory masks lighter, sturdier, and more effective.

  4. Rising Demand for Splash-resistant Surgical Masks: According to product type, the Australia and New Zealand surgical masks market is divided into basic surgical masks, fluid/splash-resistant surgical masks, and anti-fog foam surgical masks. By product, the Australia and New Zealand respiratory masks market is bifurcated into particulate-shaped respiratory masks and standard respiratory masks. In 2014, the fluid/splash-resistant surgical mask segment dominated the overall surgical and respiratory mask market. The rising demand for fluid-splash resistant surgical masks will drive the market in the years to come.

  5. Expanding Hospital Infrastructure: On the basis of end use, the Australia and New Zealand surgical and respiratory masks market is classified into life science professionals, veterinary surgeons, independent dental surgeons, general physicians, day surgery centers, and hospitals (acute). During the forecast period, the hospitals (acute) segment is expected to dominate the Australia and New Zealand surgical and respiratory masks market.

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The hospitals segment will also dominate the market in terms of distribution channels. Other distribution channels in the Australia and New Zealand surgical and respiratory masks market are online sales, drug stores, clinics, and acute care centers. The key players operating in the Australia and New Zealand surgical and respiratory masks market are Smith & Nephew, 3M Company, Halyard Healthcare, Medline Industries, Mölnlycke Health Care, and Ansell Healthcare.

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